Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Revelations of Divine Love and Zombies


by J J Cohen

Through a Facebook posting and the comments she compelled me to write on it, Liza Blake has made me realize that (1) there is an untapped genre of rewritten medieval texts that needs immediate tapping, and (2) Julian of Norwich was enclosed not because she chose the life of an anchoress, but because she was a flesh-eating undead creature and allowing her to roam the streets of Norwich was not in the cards. The good people of the city wanted to keep their brains inside their skulls, not on Julian's dinner plate.

18 comments:

Ashley said...

I like the single drop of blood dangling from her lip.

My vote is for _The Life of St Cuthbert and Zombies_.

Liza Blake said...

Seriously, how did it take me so long to discover anchoresses? Buried alive, reminded repeatedly in the rules that they are dead flesh (you should not be a gossipy anchoress, because you are dead and the dead should not gossip with the living) ... what fun!

I vote for Ancrene Wisse and Zombies, or Zoombeye Wisse. Look for it on the shelves of Barnes and Noble soon, where it will no doubt be an instant bestseller.

Anonymous said...

Zombeye Wisse. Yeah.

Nicola Masciandaro said...

Zombie lover of a zombie God:

‘The dead god is not a tired, abolished or doomed god but a god with its ultimate weapon of catastrophic devastation. . . . In the process of descending, the dead god rediscovers its . . . corpus as a pestilential but love-saturated communion with the sacred.’ Reza Negarestani, Cyclonopedia, 204-5.

Dr. Virago said...

Te-hee! Though I think Margery would make a more effective zombie, since she's more mobile. Though as Liza indirectly points out, there's something already zombie-like about anchoresses.

Anonymous said...

How about "The Ecclesiastical History of the English People and Zombies"? Miracle workers, battle scenes between Oswald and others vs. the Zombie Hordes, the mark of the saint being the incorrupt corpse rather than turning into a zombie...

Ana said...

I love the button-like eyes, reminds me of Coraline!

ASM said...

I've wondered how one gets to be an author in that series. I read the first, and thought it was great. I've got Sense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters, now but have not read it yet. But really, how does one get in on this action? It would take a long weekend, at most, to rewrite one of these...

dan remein said...

something i blogged a while back on my own blog, and excerpt from a longer essay all about julian, the living dead, and the relationship of such living death to writing and the production of sense

way to go liza and jjc! and nice quote nicola! cheers all around for zombies and anchorites! i think m kempe though, perhaps a bit too ALIVE! a bit too like frampton comes alive, even.

Little Nemo said...

Troilus and Criseyde and Cthulhu?

History of the Kings of Britain and Werewolves?

And think of the possibilities for each of the Canterbury Tales...

Anonymous said...

I still think the Death and Reviving of Arthur has a nice ring to it!

Rick Godden said...

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and the Highlander. Gawain finds out that he's actually an immortal, and he feels the Quickening as he approaches the Green Chapel. And since Sean Connery already played the Green Knight in 84, he was obviously looking forward to his role in Highlander in 1986.

Plus Queen's soundtrack for Highlander works so well when you have lyrics like "Don't lose your head."

shannon said...

Abelard and Heloise: Vampire couple.

irina said...

Dude, this is no fun at all when your medieval lit already has zombies.

irina said...

That said, my own choice would be.... Sermo Lupi ad Zombies.

(With the werewolf, of course.)

Liza Blake said...

I've been giving this some thought, and Irena raises a valid point. We've already got zombies, so clearly we need to spread the good word. What other classic literary works need are a little sicko medievalist touch. Pride and Prejudice and and Anchoresses, here I come!

Jeffrey J. Cohen said...

Then I will suggest "The Sound and the Fury and the Cistercian Revolution"

henchminion said...

I propose that we continue the series with The Letters of Catharine of Siena, Vampire. She certainly liked blood imagery.